Day 13: The hatchlings are still in the nest. Precisely how many feathers do they need before they can fly? Of course, if I were in their position, I’d be perfectly happy to lie in bed all day and be fed tasty insects.

Oriental Magpie-Robins, Day 13

Oriental Magpie-Robins, Day 13

Day 14: Morning, and the slugabeds are still there.

Oriental Magpie-Robins, Day 14

Oriental Magpie-Robins, Day 14

Around about noon I noticed that for the first time one of the hatchlings was poking its head above the edge of the light fitting. An hour later it made its way onto the rim.

The First Bird

The First Bird

Fifteen minutes later the second bird appeared. It’s noticeably smaller than the first one. I guess we now know who got the lion’s share of the insects.

And Then There Were Two

And Then There Were Two

A few minutes later and the first bird had flown off, leaving behind the smaller one.

Left Behind, Looking Forlorn

Left Behind, Looking Forlorn

It was a full hour and twenty minutes before the second bird flew. During that time it would occasionally stand up an stretch its wings, with the occasional flutter. The parents visited it three or four times to feed it, but the impression given was that they were leaving it alone to encourage it to take to the air.

It’s now evening and the birds are still around. The larger one has no trouble flitting between the branches of a nearby tree. The smaller one, however, seems pretty much confined to the ground for the moment. Fingers crossed it’ll be OK.

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